Writing Conflict: How to Ruin (Fictional) Lives

Sometimes, terrible things happen to characters. It’s just a fact of fiction.

But as authors, sometimes we want pull back before things get too awful for our sweet, precious characters. Sometimes we want to make things easy because we love them.

My dear writer friends, that is not how our characters grow. Like mama birds shoving their chicks out of the nest to make them fly, we must make everything just awful so their true potential can shine.

Here are a few ways I like to shove my character birdies out of the nest:

  1. Take away something they love.
  2. Give them something they want. Take it away.
  3. Make it impossible for them to have something they want because of their own action/inaction.
  4. Do the opposite of what they want. If they want to go right, force them left.
  5. Make someone else want the thing your character wants so they have to race for it.
  6. Give someone else the thing your character wants.
  7. Use one goal against another in a battle of What’s Most Important?
  8. Destroy the thing they want so that no one can have it. (Cackling encouraged.)

Okay, lots of my ways to ruin lives involve waving what they want in front of them—then snatching it away. That sounds really, really mean, but believe me, properly motivated characters are characters willing to take action. And the closer they get to what they want, the harder they work.

And if the thing they want is gone/impossible to get, the character might have to reach higher for a new goal— something they didn’t know they wanted until everything else was stripped away. Maybe they couldn’t see it before. Maybe their focus was divided.

Don’t limit their goals to one thing, though! Give them a few things to desire, even if they mostly take action toward one thing. Keeping loved ones safe is always a good goal. Going after their personal dreams is another good one. Family and dreams can be good at conflicting with one another. (Sometimes families want characters to be a blacksmith, but the character wants to be a candlemaker! And sometimes characters have to choose between saving the blacksmith family from a tragic goat stampede . . . and going to the chandler convention in the next town over.)

And heck, definitely use combinations of the above list. Don’t limit yourself to one trick. Push until those little character birdies fly.

How else do you like to ruin your characters’ lives motivate your characters to take action?

                 

3 Responses to Writing Conflict: How to Ruin (Fictional) Lives

  1. Alexa S. Nov 18 2015 at 9:37 am #

    This post is SO you, in the best way. Whenever I find myself not wanting to have any of my characters going through difficult things, I try to step out of that mindset by saying, “What would Jodi do?” It actually works 😉

  2. Marine Nov 18 2015 at 3:55 pm #

    My hero! Thank you so much for the tips they’re incredibly helpful!

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