Author Archive | Julie

Research, Research, Research: How to Write Historical Fiction

Imagine you’re at the theatre. The lights are going down, and the curtain to a show you’ve been waiting to see for years is about to rise. Let’s say it’s Hamilton since we’re talking historical fiction. The orchestra begins to play and slowly on stage actors are revealed. But something’s wrong. Our lead is wearing a Confederate soldier uniform and waving the Dixie flag. You know Hamilton takes places during the Revolutionary War. To make […]

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My Cut Material File and How it Frees Me

Sometimes when an actor is being interviewed, they will say they were in a particular film, “but my scene was left on the cutting room floor,” meaning they were cut out of the movie. This used to strike me as pretty depressing. Just the thought of all that work—work by the actors, the director, and the cinematographer— all tossed out because the film editor thought it wasn’t needed. That was before I learned the hard […]

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Crafting a Strong Beginning

Hey there PubCrawlers! Today I’m sharing a craft post about writing a strong beginning. As with any and all craft-oriented posts shared here by me or any of the other PubCrawl writers, keep in mind that this advice is meant to be general and certainly will not apply to all stories. First, an apology. I’m sharing with you a three-point list I use to help me craft my story beginnings, but I no longer remember […]

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Guest Post: Who Is This Book For?

I always get a very particular kind of nervous when my mother reads my books. She’s a voracious reader and isn’t afraid to tell me what she really thinks, which is both incredibly valuable and maybe a little bit terrifying. So when I gave her the ARC of my upcoming release (the young adult novel Questions I Want to Ask You, which comes out today, yay!), I wasn’t surprised at her first question: “Why so […]

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Guest Post: Finding the Middle Grade Voice

Back when I first started writing YA, I was still a young adult myself. I was seventeen when I began drafting the book that became What’s Left of Me, where the main characters were fifteen years old, and I never spent much time figuring out how a fifteen-year-old spoke, or acted, or thought, because I’d been one myself just two years back. Even as I got older and continued the Hybrid Chronicles, writing in a […]

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