Genre Jumping and Author Branding

So J.K. Rowling recently announced her new novel, and it isn’t Harry Potter. I was browsing in a book store with a friend and we came across a sign that showcased The Casual Vacancy and gave a brief description of what it was about. No joke, the first words out of my friend’s mouth were, “That doesn’t sound magical!” Granted, she wasn’t being totally serious, but I’m sure a lot of other people were thinking […]

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Interview with E.C. Myers, author of Fair Coin, plus giveaway!

Fair Coin Sixteen-year-old Ephraim Scott is horrified when he comes home from school and finds his mother unconscious at the kitchen table, clutching a bottle of pills. The reason for her suicide attempt is even more disturbing: she thought she’d identified Ephraim’s body at the hospital that day. Among his dead double’s belongings, Ephraim finds a strange coin—a coin that grants wishes when he flips it. With a flick of his thumb, he can turn […]

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The Trickle Down Effect: Predicting the Next Big Trend

by Rachel Seigel — Regardless of what aspect of the book world we are involved in, we are constantly peering into our proverbial crystal balls desperately trying to glean some answer as to what the next big trend will be. (Especially in the Children’s/YA market which is rapidly outpacing adult books in sales and popularity.) As a bookseller/buyer, I’m asked this question on a regular basis, and my customers are always surprised to learn how […]

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How To Write A 1-Page Synopsis

One thing writers hate doing but will inevitably have to do (one day or another, at least) is the Dreaded Synopsis. An agent may request it in his/her submission materials, or an editor might want it once your agent has you out on subs. My film agent needed it for shopping around Something Strange & Deadly, and I would imagine other rights-agents would want a short, simple synopsis for the same reason. So in other […]

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Conditioning Forces – Or, your character doesn’t live in a vacuum!

In the 1951 play, Bedtime Story, by Sean O’Casey, the protagonist is faced with the goal of getting a prostitute out of his apartment before his roommate comes home. The character’s goals are founded on the fact that he is a devout Roman Catholic, feels terribly guilty, and doesn’t want his indiscretion to be discovered. Getting the prostitute out of the house without being detected becomes the main character’s all encompassing goal. The prospect of […]

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