Writing Futuristic Fiction in (what feels like) a Science Fiction World

When I was in my teens, in the late 80s, one of my favourite Ray Bradbury stories was “There Will Come Soft Rains”.  Published in 1950, it’s a story of beautifully understated tragedy, about a futuristic-style house full of automatic functions, that keeps on functioning (cooking breakfast, dimming lights, reading poetry) even though its occupants have all been killed by a nuclear catastrophe. I was fascinated, both by the concept itself and by the idea […]

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But Wait- There’s More!: Must-Read Series.

by Rachel Seigel — For almost as long as there have been books written for children and teens, there have also been series books. Authors (and publishers) have long-understood the allure of re-visiting the same characters multiple times, and as readers, we demand it. Books draw us into their world, and make us care deeply about the characters who inhabit them. These characters are our friends, and the idea that their story is finished is […]

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How to write a scary scene

This is a repost from Let the Words Flow, but I’ve updated it. To be totally honest, I’ve learned a bit more about the subject since I first tackled it. This post originally stemmed from a question about Something Strange and Deadly. Since the book has ghosts and walking corpses, someone asked, “How do you write a scary scene?” With that I sat down and thought about what makes a scene scary—how I crafted the frightening bits […]

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3 Steps For Taking Your Writing To The Next Level

There are any number of posts out there (including many by me!) on how to improve your writing. Today, I’m not focusing on specific tips–I’m asking you to step back and take a look at how you’re approaching your writing. If you can cover these three angles, you’ll improve. Guaranteed. 1. Get serious about craft. Read like a writer. Pick up great books in your field–or just great books–and study what makes them work. When […]

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Self-promotion: an author’s perspective and guide

As my fellow Pub Crawler, Joanna Volpe, so eloquently put it a few weeks back: Most of your publicity and outreach to the general market is up to you. We all have giant dreams of a publisher who does everything for us, and I have a few friends who are in this very enviable position. But I have more friends in a position like mine—a position that leaves the majority of the publicity grunt work […]

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