Tag Archives | Julie Eshbaugh

You Tell Us–What Are Your Favorite Writing Quotes?

Hi all, it’s Julie! Today I want to share some of my favorite quotes about writing, and invite YOU to share your favorites, too. I love a great quote–especially if it’s a real truism about writing–and I love to learn what quotes other people admire. So please read on, and share your own in the comments. (And please don’t feel too restricted by the “about writing” part of this. Arguably, some of these–especially the one […]

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The Basics of Show Don’t Tell

Hi all; Julie here! Today’s post goes back to basics with a discussion of Show Don’t Tell. (For other approaches to this rule, you can read JJ’s piece on balancing the mix of showing and telling, Pub Crawl alum Susan Dennard’s post on using showing and telling on macro and micro levels, and Kat’s approach to when to show and when to tell.) There are few rules of craft that can be applied to a […]

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Happy Thanksgiving! We are Thankful for Passionate Readers

I have always been a reader. Throughout my life, I’ve fallen in love with one book after another, rearranging my shelves so that my favorite-of-the-moment gets the best spot. When I really love a book, just the sight of the cover will make me happy. I try to keep my room arranged so I can see the cover of several favorite books when I open my eyes in the morning. I guess this is just […]

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Creating Character Voice

Hi PubCrawlers! Julie here, and today I want to talk a bit about Character Voice—that is, the pattern of thought and speech that is unique to each character. A strong and distinct voice will help bring a character to life on the page. I want to be clear in differentiating Character Voice from Writer’s Voice, or the voice you as a writer bring to your stories. JJ and Kelly have a great podcast about Writer’s […]

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Creating a Satisfying Character Arc

Hi all! Julie here! Today I’d like to talk about character arc—what it is and why it matters. I’d also like to share my own personal approach to creating an arc for a character. A character arc is the change that happens to a character in response to the events of the plot. A cowardly character might become brave, a stingy character might become generous, or a timid character might become confident. Those are broad […]

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